Irish Peatland Conservation Council http://www. Action for Bogs and Wildlife in Ireland Wed, 28 Jul 2021 15:56:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v= International Bog Day 2021: Taking Action for Peatlands http://www./international-bog-day-2021-taking-action-peatlands/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 13:15:43 +0000 http://www./?p=6519 Press Release  International Bog Day 2021: Taking Action for Peatlands 19th July 2021         On the 25th of July, the Irish Peatland Conservation Council (IPCC) are celebrating International Bog Day 2021 by hosting an event from 2-5pm, … Continue reading

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Untitled design (1) (1)Press Release

 International Bog Day 2021: Taking Action for Peatlands

19th July 2021

 

 

 

 

On the 25th of July, the Irish Peatland Conservation Council (IPCC) are celebrating International Bog Day 2021 by hosting an event from 2-5pm, to promote our new Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan 2030, at the Bog of Allen Nature Centre. International Bog Day is an annual worldwide day of celebration to raise awareness of the importance of peatlands and the variety of ecosystem services they provide us all.  The Irish Peatland Conservation Council are delighted to also share that while we will be raising the profile of peatlands as Climate Change Champions in the afternoon of International Bog Day with a public event, in the morning we will be taking action for peatlands.  A group of Climate Change Ambassadors from An Taisce’s Climate Ambassador Programme will be helping to remove invading scrub along the boundary of Lodge Bog.

Peatlands are wetlands with a high-water table where undecomposed dead plants accumulate over thousands of years forming peat.  The plants that accumulate in a peatland are undecomposed as the high water table limits oxygen and prevents the agents of decay, bacteria and fungi, from working.   As a result, peatlands are carbon stores and according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, are the largest store of terrestrial carbon in the world!   Earlier this year the Irish Peatland Conservation Council published our 7th Action Plan Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan.   Visiting the Bog of Allen Nature Centre on International Bog Day from 2pm, the peatland exhibition and wildlife gardens will be open for you to enjoy at your leisure.  At 2.30pm expect to learn more about the role peatlands have as Climate Change Champions and discover some of the initiatives undertaken by the Climate Change Ambassadors to raise awareness of Climate Change through short outdoor talks.  To close the day the Irish Peatland Conservation Council will lead a walk to Lodge Bog at 3.30pm.

To keep us all safe and adhere to HSE Covid-19 guidelines we are asking all those that are intending to join us from 2pm on International Bog Day to register for this event by calling the centre on 045-860133 or e-mail bogs@.

This event is supported by Kildare County Council under the Festival Grant 2021, the Community Foundation for Ireland and the Tides Foundation.

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Celebrating the Unique & Diverse Peatland Biodiversity on National Biodiversity Week 2021 http://www./celebrating-the-unique-diverse-peatland-biodiversity-on-national-biodiversity-week-2021/ Fri, 14 May 2021 17:23:18 +0000 http://www./?p=6473 Press Release Celebrating the Unique & Diverse Biodiversity of Peatlands on National Biodiversity Week 2021 14.5.21  The Irish Peatland Conservation Council in partnership with the Irish Environmental Network are delighted to celebrate National Biodiversity Week 2021 with you – virtually.  … Continue reading

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Celebrating the Unique & Diverse Biodiversity of Peatlands on National Biodiversity Week 2021
14.5.21

 The Irish Peatland Conservation Council in partnership with the Irish Environmental Network are delighted to celebrate National Biodiversity Week 2021 with you – virtually.  Irish Peatlands are home to a diverse range of plants and animals many of which are unique to these wet wonderlands.  Insect eating Sundews that have a special glue to trap insects, Bog Asphodels that form a partnership with a Rhizobium bacteria, Meadow Pipits, Skylarks and water storing Sphagnum mosses are just examples of some of the biodiversity found on peatlands.   The charity (CHY6829, RCN20013547) have scheduled a range of free events throughout the week and we encourage you to join the celebrations with us.

A healthy peatland has a water table within 20cm of the surface.  Dragonflies are important indicator species of both freshwater and terrestrial habitats. The Black Darter dragonfly is found on peatlands and in acidic freshwater habitats where its presence alone represents the quality of the natural environment.  To raise the profile of our winged peatland friends the Irish Peatland Conservation Council are encouraging young friends of the bog to get crafty by making their own dragonfly.  A social media video will be available from the 15th May on the Facebook account of the charity https://www.facebook.com//?ref=hl and a PDF is available in our Discover and Learn section of this website providing instructions.

To get you exploring bogs from the 17th May take part in the peatland habitat and biodiversity crossword for your chance to win one of two Friend of the Bog memberships.  You can join the crossword by visiting Biodiversity Week Crossword 2021.  In 2021 the first record of the Comma butterfly was identified during the National Butterfly Monitoring Scheme on Lullymore West Bog.  Join the Irish Peatland Conservation on Wednesday 19th at 1pm for an online talk as we share with you some skills to get you started identifying butterflies in your community.   On Friday 21st May again at 1pm the Irish Peatland Conservation Council will be hosting an online talk encouraging you to choose peat free through home composting.  You will learn some of the top tips to get you started composting in your garden, the different types of compost systems available to you and frequently asked questions. Register through Eventbrite for the butterfly talk at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/154727154083 and the compost talk at  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/154760379461

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council are delighted to be taking part in Backyard BioBlitz 2021 co-ordinated by the Irish Environmental Network.  Joined by wildlife experts from the Native Woodland Trust and Irish Wildlife Trust we will be online between the weekend of 21st-23rd May helping you identify the variety of wildlife you find in your gardens. Get involved by simply tagging your photos on Twitter @Irishenvnet  or Instagram @national.biodiversity.week using the hashtag #BackyardBioblitz.

There is something for everyone planned this National Biodiversity Week and we encourage you to get involved.

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Publication of Ireland’s new Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan 2030 – Celebrating Earth Day 2021 http://www./launch-of-irelands-new-peatlands-and-climate-change-action-plan-2030-celebrating-earth-day-2021/ Wed, 21 Apr 2021 14:30:05 +0000 http://www./?p=6403 Press Release Publication of Ireland’s new Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan 2030 Celebrating Earth Day 2021 22nd April 2021       The Irish Peatland Conservation Council are celebrating this Earth Day, 22nd of April 2021, with the publication … Continue reading

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Press Release

Publication of Ireland’s new Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan 2030 Celebrating Earth Day 2021

22nd April 2021

 

 

 

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council are celebrating this Earth Day, 22nd of April 2021, with the publication of the charities 7th Action Plan – Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan 2030. The theme for Earth Day this year is ‘Restore Our Earth’. Peatlands cover 3% of the land surface globally and are estimated to store 1,566 million tonnes of carbon in Ireland1. In 2019 Ireland declared a climate and biodiversity emergency. The Irish Government have acknowledged that action needs to be taken to understand the causes and impacts of climate change.

This action plan explains the unique role between peatlands and climate, restoration methods and costs, policies in place currently, threats, peatland values and so much more. It answers some frequently asked questions. How much carbon is sequestered in peatlands? What are the restoration costs? What state are peatlands in? What actions are needed?

The action plan identifies 12 actions that can be viewed as the building blocks to support peatlands in the fight against climate change for all of us and which will also guide the Irish Peatland Conservation Councils ‘Save the Bogs Campaign’ as we enter the United Nations Decade of Ecosystem Restoration. These building blocks of peatland actions will also support government, local authorities, community groups and individuals to protect peatlands and guide policy makers in the right direction for the future of our peatland habitat. As Ireland continues to address the challenges our biodiversity faces this action plan should be read in conjunction with the Irish Peatland Conservation Councils 6th Action Plan 2020 – Halting the Loss of Peatland Biodiversity.

Peatlands are essential carbon sinks and habitats for a unique and diverse range of biodiversity. 53% of the soil carbon is sequestered in raised and blanket bogs in Ireland which cover less than 20% of the land surface2.  Restoration of peatlands that have been drained or degraded is a long and complicated process. The more damaged a site is, the higher the costs and longer period for results but, in the end the results outweigh all as the savings in greenhouse gas emissions would be worth it. By restoring peatlands through rewetting, landowners can reduce carbon emissions with some sites becoming carbon sinks in the order of 0.4 to 1.04 t C ha-1 yr-1 such as drained only, domestic cutover bogs, nutrient-poor industrial cutaway and peatlands reclaimed to grassland3.

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council want to see the government commit to the protection of peatlands by developing a 20-year peatlands restoration and rehabilitation action plan with a budget of €1 billion to make our country climate resilient and carbon neutral (Action 1). The Irish Peatland Conservation Council also identify that the establishment of a carbon credit system for corporations and individuals could help to fund essential restoration and rehabilitation of peatlands in Ireland (Action 5). The Irish Peatland Conservation Council call for peat extraction for the horticultural industry to stop and find a sustainable alternative (Action 8). We need to hold ourselves accountable and a new storyline in education regarding peatlands and climate change must be developed and implemented across all curricula, back to back with a strong public awareness campaign (Action 6).

Paula Farrell, IPCC’s Conservation and Education Officer has this to say; ‘The Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan 2030 was made possible with the support of the charities Friends of the Bog, its promotion over the coming year has been supported by the Tides Foundation and print copies and distribution of these supported by the Heritage Council and we express our thanks for this support. We need to take action now to protect our peatlands and put them on the right path for recovery’.

You can both purchase a copy of the Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan 2030 or download a digital copy on the website of the Irish Peatland Conservation Council www..

Editors Notes:

References
1. National Parks and Wildlife Service (2015) National Peatlands Strategy, Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Dublin.
2. Tomlinson, R.W. (2005) Soil Carbon Stocks and changes in the Republic of Ireland. Journal of Environmental Management 76: 77-93
3. Renou-Wilson, F., Wilson, D., Rigney, C., Byrne, K., Farrell, C. & Müller., C. (2018) Research 236: Network Monitoring Rewetted and Restored Peatlands/Organic Soils for Climate and Biodiversity Benefits (NEROS). EPA Wexford.

Acknowledgements
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Lunchtime with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council http://www./lunchtime-with-the-irish-peatland-conservation-council/ Wed, 07 Apr 2021 21:42:44 +0000 http://www./?p=6370 PRESS RELEASE 8th April 2021 Lunchtime with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council   Grab a sandwich, salad or bowl of soup and join the Irish Peatland Conservation Council for a series of short virtual talks at lunchtime. In 2021 the … Continue reading

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8th April 2021

Lunchtime with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council

 

Grab a sandwich, salad or bowl of soup and join the Irish Peatland Conservation Council for a series of short virtual talks at lunchtime. In 2021 the Irish Peatland Conservation Council are developing the raised bog habitat of Lodge Bog for community groups into a best practice model of peatland restoration, species monitoring and research, an initiative supported by the Community Foundation for Ireland Biodiversity Fund. This series of ten virtual talks will explore all aspects of peatlands hosted at 1pm from the 13th April and all you need to do to get involved is register by e-mailing bogs@ .

The talks will be of particular interest to peatland custodians nationwide and will offer an insight into peatland habitat, their values and species monitoring with two talks focusing on the threatened Curlew and under recorded Large Heath Butterfly both iconic peatland species. Talks will also explore how to complete a peatland habitat assessment, peatland restoration and habitat monitoring including drain blocking, Sphagnum moss transfer and measuring the water table on your local bog. Visit www./events/ to explore the full schedule of peatland virtual talks at lunchtime.

Covid-19 has had an impact on social gatherings, at this time of year the Irish Peatland Conservation Council would normally have a full schedule of events planned for members of the public discovering peatlands by visiting peatland habitat.   All of our efforts to restrict our movements are keeping our communities safe and with support from the Irish Environmental Network fundraising support grant the Irish Peatland Conservation Council are going virtual.

It is easy to get involved in these short online lunchtime talks, that are free and all are welcome to attend. To register simply e-mail bogs@ and you will receive the zoom link to join. Peatlands are found nationwide and while some are fortunate to have peatlands in their local 5km for many others they do not. Going virtual will enable all of us, together, to discover and explore the importance of these wet and wild landscapes and the values they provide for all.

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Giving a Voice for Peatlands within the Use of Peat in Horticulture Working Group http://www./irish-peatland-conservation-council-look-forward-to-giving-a-voice-for-peatlands-within-the-use-of-peat-in-horticulture-working-group/ Thu, 04 Mar 2021 14:41:21 +0000 http://www./?p=6346 Press Release Giving a Voice for Peatlands within the Use of Peat in Horticulture Working Group  4th March 2021 The Irish Peatland Conservation Council have campaigned for an end to the use of peat in horticulture for over 35 years … Continue reading

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Giving a Voice for Peatlands within the Use of Peat in Horticulture Working Group 

4th March 2021

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council have campaigned for an end to the use of peat in horticulture for over 35 years and welcome the opportunity to give a voice for peatlands within the Use of Peat in the Horticulture Working Group.   The Irish Peatland Conservation Council needs to see an end to the use of peat as a growing medium as it has destroyed vast areas of unique habitat, the carbon released through peat extraction is fuelling climate change and the biodiversity loss imposed on Ireland and our future generations is immense. The planning and industrial licensing regimes have failed to protect a sufficient amount of intact peatland habitat and now we are in a position if we continue to extract peat for horticulture the future prospects for Ireland’s peatland habitats are disheartening. However, today, we know that restoration of these sites can help to reverse some of the damage caused but to start we must work together for the ecosystem services of Irish peatland habitat to be realised.  We look forward to working with the other organisations as we see this working group as a step in the right direction for nature conservation in Ireland. The end to the extraction of peat for horticulture products will put Ireland on the right path to a sustainable economy, sustainable jobs and a stable environment.

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Hop To It This World Wetlands Day with IPCC http://www./6330-2/ Tue, 26 Jan 2021 12:32:30 +0000 http://www./?p=6330               Press Release Hop to It this World Wetlands Day with IPCC 26th January 2020 Celebrate this World Wetlands Day by taking part in the Irish Peatland Conservation Council’s fun frog quiz as the … Continue reading

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Press Release

Hop to It this World Wetlands Day with IPCC

26th January 2020

Celebrate this World Wetlands Day by taking part in the Irish Peatland Conservation Council’s fun frog quiz as the charity raises awareness and launches the Hop To It Frog Survey 2021. The 2nd of February marks World Wetlands Day and this year the theme is Wetlands and Water. Water is vital for the survival of all life on earth including a very familiar garden friend, the Common Frog, which is dependent on water to complete its lifecycle.   As its name suggests, it is a very common species in Ireland. It is found in a variety of habitats such as garden ponds, grasslands, hedgerows and wetlands such as bogs.

It is a myth that frogs need to be near a water source all year round. They are amphibious which means they can live comfortably on both land and water. During the colder months, you will more than likely find frogs hiding in long grass or in dark and damp places, hibernating. However, water is essential for the frog to complete its lifecycle. The male and female frogs return to water to breed, typically in Spring when the weather begins to warm. Each male competes against other males for a female by croaking. The female chooses her mate and breeding begins.  A special pad called a nuptial pad allows the male to grip onto the female.  Frogs are known for returning to the same source of water each year and the female lays hundreds of eggs.  Not all eggs survive as they are eaten by many predators, providing an essential food source as part of the food-chain.

In Ireland, the common frog (Rana temporaria) is protected by law under the Irish Wildlife Act and the European Union Habitats Directive. While its population on the IUCN Red List is stable (IUCN 2021), it faces numerous local threats, many of these threats are unnatural and caused by humans. The release of harmful chemicals from fertilisers and pesticides, the loss of habitat as a result of drainage and the habitat removal of wildlife corridors are just some to name a few. If you drive in the countryside, you might happen upon fields that no longer have a hedgerow to mark the boundary. These are essential wildlife corridors allowing frogs to move from a wetland or freshwater habitat to a terrestrial habitat. Removing these corridors increases the risk of predation. A frog’s skin is a special organ which it uses to breathe through under water. When harmful chemicals are present in a water source, these are absorbed through the skin causing death. Protecting this animal’s habitat is important for its survival.

IPCC’s Campaign Officer Paula Farrell says “A bog is a wetland which frogs are specially adapted to. This fascinating little animal has the ability to camouflage and blend in with its background essentially hiding in plain sight from predators. This makes them excellent hunters as they lay in wait for prey. They also provide an insight into the quality or status of a habitat just by their presence alone due to the sensitive nature of their skin. I feel it is incredibly important to protect this animal and its habitat”

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council co-ordinate the Hop To It Frog Survey. It began in 1997, and each Spring IPCC launch this annual survey in order to encourage people to get involved with this citizen science campaign and record their frog sightings. IPCC use this information to inform our policy work, track changes in the Irish frog population and protect essential wetlands especially where frogs are present.  You can submit your frog sighting online on the website of the Irish Peatland Conservation Council by visiting http://www./help-ipcc/hop-to-it-national-frog-survey-irelandcard/.

Although you cannot visit the Bog of Allen Nature Centre at this time, we will be hosting a World Wetlands Day Frog Crossword Competition 2021 for you to get involved. For those that are familiar with frogs, it will test your knowledge. For those who know little about frogs, you will learn something new. The first 10 people to answer correctly and send your completed frog quiz into IPCC will receive a hard copy of our Hop To It Frog booklet. Send your frog quiz by email at bogs@ or by post to Bog of Allen Nature Centre, Lullymore, Rathangan, Co. Kildare.

 

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While The Horticultural Industry Talks about Change, Habitat and Wildlife Destruction Continues http://www./press-release-while-the-horticultural-industry-talks-about-change-habitat-and-wildlife-destruction-continues/ Mon, 28 Sep 2020 10:01:13 +0000 http://www./?p=6182 Press Release While The Horticultural Industry Talks about Change, Habitat and Wildlife Destruction Continues Date: 18th September 2020 The Irish Peatland Conservation Council (IPCC) need to see an end to the use of peat within the horticultural industry. The practice … Continue reading

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Screen Shot 2020-09-28 at 10.55.29Press Release

While The Horticultural Industry Talks about Change, Habitat and Wildlife Destruction Continues

Date: 18th September 2020

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council (IPCC) need to see an end to the use of peat within the horticultural industry. The practice of peat extraction leaves behind open brown mines degrading our air, water and wildlife. There is little environmental regulation in this industry and horticultural peat extraction has directly contributed to the near-extinction of key Irish species such as the wonderful wader – The Curlew.

The recently published report on the Review of the use of Peat Moss in the Horticultural Industry Public Consultation has recommended that a working group is to be established including Government Departments/State Agencies, Industry Stakeholders and environmental Non-Governmental Organizations.

The IPCC made a submission on the public consultation highlighting the fact that there is no carbon tax being paid on the ¾ of a million tones or more of horticultural compost being exported or millions of bags of compost being sold to gardeners, that the majority of companies operate outside of planning and licensing and the destruction of the Irish landscape unnecessarily.

“While a dialogue channel is opening, it can not be seen as a success until real change is witnessed. Ireland’s natural environment has suffered without a voice and while talk emerges the mining still continues” – says Tristram Whyte, Conservation Policy Officer with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council.  You can view the final report at https://www.npws.ie/news/review-use-peat-moss-horticulture-final-report-now-available

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Celebrating Heritage Week 2020 with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council – Virtually! http://www./celebrating-heritage-week-2020-with-the-irish-peatland-conservation-council-virtually/ Fri, 14 Aug 2020 16:04:42 +0000 http://www./?p=6150 Press Release Celebrating Heritage Week 2020 with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council – Virtually! Friday 14th August 2020 Due to the current restrictions and with the safety of us all in mind the Irish Peatland Conservation Council are going virtual for … Continue reading

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images-1Press Release
Celebrating Heritage Week 2020 with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council – Virtually!

Friday 14th August 2020

Due to the current restrictions and with the safety of us all in mind the Irish Peatland Conservation Council are going virtual for Heritage Week 2020!
On the 15th of August, IPCC will be uploading a short video as part of Heritage Week on our current project at the Bog of Allen Nature Centre called the ‘Pollinator Enhancement Study’ which was made possible with funding support through the Heritage Grant scheme 2020 of Kildare County Council. Our video explains why grassland management has an impact on pollinator numbers and takes you through the various methods incorporated in the project to increase the biodiversity and abundance of pollinator friendly plants. The aim is to assess the most cost-effective method so that community groups get more bang for their bucks. View some cheeky clips of our pollinators at work and the most popular plants they visit https://www.youtube.com/user/ConservationPeatland.

During any usual year the Irish Peatland Conservation Council would be hosting peatlands walks and talks exploring the natural heritage of the these wet and wild habitats in Ireland.  We would be sharing with you the values of peatlands including their role in carbon storage and explore how drainage has affected their role as climate change champions.  This year with support from Meath County Council through their Heritage Grant scheme 2020 the Irish Peatland Conservation Council will be exploring the depth of peat within an area of cutover peatland on Girley Bog, Co. Meath. Why?  Nuala Madigan, Environmental Education Officer explains “understanding the remaining depth of peat on this area of Girley Bog will guide the future restoration initiatives on the site.  Restoration aims to reduce the fluctuation in the seasonal water table on the site and in turn maximise the carbon storage potential”.  Celebrating this project we encourage you to visit IPCC’s online Peatland Management toolkit where you can discover the variety of actions we can take to conserve a sample of Irish peatlands.  Visit http://www./advice/peatland-management-diy-tool-kit/ to get started.At the end of Heritage Week 2020, Water Heritage Day will be celebrated on the 23rd August.  This year discover the wonderful array of lush wildflowers along the banks of the Ballygoran Stream in Co. Kildare with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council and the Local Authority Water Programme.   Understand the importance of this river from source to mouth and witness the pollinator friendly plants that bring this river to life by watching a colourful online video at https://www.youtube.com/user/ConservationPeatland.

IPCC’s Campaign Officer Paula Farrell says “2020 has proved a difficult year for hosting events but it has also empowered us to explore new avenues of sharing the Heritage of Bogs, Water and Wildlife to a far greater audience that we hope to inspire. Be sure to check out our online events for Heritage Week 2020 and discover the wildlife on your doorstep”.

Editors Notes:
The Irish Peatland Conservation Council would like to Thank and acknowledge funding support for these projects from Kildare County Council, Meath County Council and the Local Authority Water Programme
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IPCC Welcome the Imminent Publication of the 100th Irish Wildlife Manual http://www./6135-2/ Tue, 04 Aug 2020 10:57:09 +0000 http://www./?p=6135 PRESS RELEASE IPCC Welcome the Imminent Publication of the 100th Irish Wildlife Manual – The Habitats of Cutover Raised Bog by National Parks & Wildlife Service Monday 27th July 2020 The Irish Peatland Conservation Council (IPCC) welcome the imminent publication … Continue reading

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IPCC Welcome the Imminent Publication of the 100th Irish Wildlife Manual – The Habitats of Cutover Raised Bog by National Parks & Wildlife Service

Monday 27th July 2020

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council (IPCC) welcome the imminent publication of the 100th Irish Wildlife Manual commissioned by National Parks & Wildlife Service and funded by the EU LIFE Project Restoring Active Raised Bog in Ireland’s SAC Network 2016-20. By extensively studying the many types of peat-forming vegetation that grows on cutover (formerly cut for turf) raised bog a classification scheme has been developed that describes the habitats that may be present on these cutover areas.

IPCC are delighted because such a key is long overdue and is something that we have been advocating since 1999 when we undertook a study of cutover bogs and discovered many fine wildlife rich area.

“It is so important to discover where active peat forming bog vegetation still exists as the habitat has been almost driven to extinction” says Mr Tristram Whyte – IPCC’s Conservation Policy Officer.

The IPCC were invited to make comments on this user-friendly document which we hope will help the public and interested parties to identify areas of high conservation value in their community. Ireland has set a target of 3600ha of active raised bog within the Special Areas of Conservation and Natural Heritage Areas Network but currently they hold as little as 1639ha.

It will be necessary to restore over 400ha of cutover habitats within the designated network and a further 1561ha will be restored within the uncut high-bog reserves over the next 15 years. Only in this way will we meet this target and prevent the habitat from going the same road as the dodo – the path to extinction.

ENDS

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council is a charity (Chy6829) that aims to conserve a representative portion of Irish Peatlands to enjoy today and in the future.

Irish Wildlife Manuals is a series of contract reports relating to the conservation management of habitats and species in Ireland. The volumes are published on an irregular basis by the National Parks and Wildlife Service.  Further information https://www.npws.ie/publications/irish-wildlife-manuals.

 

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A Call to Action this International Bog Day http://www./press-release-a-call-to-action-this-international-bog-day/ Fri, 17 Jul 2020 14:16:12 +0000 http://www./?p=6100 Press Release A Call to Action this International Bog Day Friday 17th July 2020 The Irish Peatland Conservation Council, a charity working towards the conservation of a representative portion of Irish peatlands for people to enjoy today and in the … Continue reading

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A Call to Action this International Bog Day

Friday 17th July 2020

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council, a charity working towards the conservation of a representative portion of Irish peatlands for people to enjoy today and in the future, are looking for YOUR HELP on International Bog Day. International Bog Day is a worldwide celebration held annually on the last Sunday of July and this year it falls on 26th July.   The day aims to raise awareness of the many services the wet and wild peatland habitats of Ireland offer our communities including water regulation, biodiversity, amenity and carbon storage.  Usually the Irish Peatland Conservation Council would be hosting peatland community walks and talks and opening the doors of the Bog of Allen Nature Centre for members of the public to visit at their leisure however with the Covid-19 restrictions on movement over the past few months this year the charity is offering an alternative way to celebrate peatlands and that is by asking you to ‘roll up your sleeves’ and help with the management of scrub on Lullymore West Bog.

Lullymore West Bog is recognised nationally as a butterfly haven with 22 of the Irish butterfly species recorded on the site including the threatened Marsh Fritillary butterfly.  Nuala Madigan, Education Officer with the Irish Peatland Conservation Council explains ‘the wet grassland habitat is ideal for butterflies as it provides both shade and sun exposure while supporting a wide variety of native wildflowers.  Usually at this stage of the year the Irish Peatland Conservation Council would have hosted a number of volunteer days to reduce the encroaching scrub on the site but 2020 has turned out to be a different type of year.  On returning to the reserve after Covid-19 restrictions had been eased it was evident that the reduced management on the site over the Spring and early Summer months has led to an increase in scrub encroachment.  The saying goes ‘many hands make light work’ and with this in mind we are asking people to celebrate peatlands this year by taking action.’

The outdoor setting for the management of encroaching scrub on Lullymore West Bog will allow for social distancing with ease while at the same time have a positive impact for the reserve and its wildlife.  To ensure the safety of all volunteers the Irish Peatland Conservation Council are limiting numbers, they are asking all those members of the public who would like to get involved between 1-4pm on Sunday 26th July to get in touch by e-mailing the Irish Peatland Conservation Council at bogs@ or calling the Bog of Allen Nature Centre on 045-860133.

Make a difference this International Bog Day and help enhance the habitat of Lullymore West Bog for the diversity of butterflies that call this site their home.

Image: Expedia Team Volunteer Day 2019, Lullymore West Bog, Co. Kildare © N. Madigan

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